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of newtown, connecticut. the people of connecticut can relate to these victims of the assault and all americans can relate to some extent this crime that's occurred. at this elementary school. madam speaker, i have four kids and 10 grandkids, three of my daughters are teachers by profession. my wife is a first grade elementary school teacher. and no parent, no parent ever wants to bury their child. they just don't want to do that. we never want our children to die in their youth. like these children did. so, madam speaker, we mourn with the families of connecticut. we must honor the victims in our prayers and in our words and ask the good lord to bless them, their families, the people of connecticut and yes, our country. and that's just the way it is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: the mall shooting that might have been worse and ended in newtown, connecticut, where it's impossible to imagine that it was worse. it's part of an ongoing pattern of c
children and teachers and others in connecticut, it is a time for congress to begin a thoughtful dialogue on what we can do to deal with these mass casualty incidences in our country. they have been going on for some time, but perhaps when we see the faces of children, principals, teachers, and others that burns upon our hearts and motivates us to take further action. i want to make sure that, mr. speaker, that congress takes the appropriate action in a thoughtful, willful, determined way, and not jump to quick conclusions as if simple fixes will prevent this from happening. first, to the parents of children across america who are asking questions, mr. speaker, i'd like to offer some of this advice and also in my background as a psychologist, it's important for people to remember this, parents should be asking their children what they have heard about the incident. we should listen to their concerns and their emotions. we should answer their questions with age appropriate information. we should support and comfort and reassure them of their safety at home and school. we should observe and
shooter at sandy hook elementary school in you intown, connecticut. it's heartbreaking to listen to the stories of innocent lives cut cruelly short. the pain and grief of the families and friends of these students and teachers are unimaginable. i just want to echo some of the comments that senator durbin made and senator leahy made. we know that the teachers and the aides put their life on the line in order to try to save children. the unbelievable task of the first responders coming to the scene, not knowing what they would find, we send our prayers to all. this is a tragedy beyond words, and i think president obama said it best last night that our hearts are broken. but as senator durbin has said and senator leahy, i particularly want to thank you, we need to take action. congress needs to come together and take action to protect the safety of our children. we must do better. there have been too many episodes in which children's lives and others have been lost that we must figure out ways to do things, to act to prevent these types of tragedies. this conversation must include a
from connecticut would like to speak for five minutes. and i was hoping that we could get some time where we could go back and forth and talk about the magnitsky aspects of that legislation now. am i correct, mr. president, the bill has not yet been -- going to be reported now? perhaps we could enter into a consent as to the next 30 or 40 minutes. the presiding officer: morning business is closed. under the previous order the senate will proceed to consideration of h.r. 6156, which the clerk will report. the clerk: calendar number -- mr. mccain: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent further reading be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: mr. president, i also note note the presence of our friend, senator lieberman on the floor, who also has had a major role in this legislation. and i would hope that perhaps he could be -- i ask unanimous consent he be included in the colloquy. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. mccain: again, could i ask my friend, senator cardin, i have a statement that i wanted to make before the colloquy, and i know yo
. mr. mccain: i would ask unanimous consent that the senator from connecticut be allowed four minutes, the senator from michigan allowed three minutes and i be allowed two minutes before the vote. the presiding officer: without objection. the senator from connecticut. mr. lieberman: i thank the chair and i thank my friend from arizona. i'm honored to rise to support his amendment and just to make a few points. the first is to assure all of our colleagues that this is just an amendment that asks the pentagon to conduct a study. it's nothing more than that. and i want to particularly say that to reassure anyone who is concerned that somehow this is an authorization for the use of military force. look at the wording here. that's just not the case. all we're debating here is whether -- and voting on is whether the pentagon should be asked to do a study of the possibility of how we might stop bashar al-assad's air force of committing acts of murder against his own people. in my way of thinking today, the truth -- two things. one is this amendment is simply a way of saying that we in the se
senate, the attorney general of the state of connecticut, elected to the united states senate four times, a vice-presidential nominee in the year 2000, a candidate for president, and i should probably add nearly a nominee for vice president again. that he managed to achieve such prominence while being the least partisan politician i know is a credit to his character and to the exemplary quality of his public service and to the public's too often frustrated desire for leaders who seek office to do something, not just to be someone. he has been a tireless advocate for the rights of the oppressed, the misfortuneate, the disenfranchised. tireless, too, in his concern for the security of the united states, for the strength of our alliances, the excellence of our armed forces and the general progress of our values. he came here to do justice, to love mercy and to walk humbly with his god. it's hard to find anyone here who doesn't like and admire joe. he's impossible to dislike, even if you only know him a little. most of his detractors seem to be people who don't know him and who tend to view
babies we lost most recently in connecticut. put down those guns. don't even think about it because one bullet, just one bullet will kill the party. please, america, put down those guns. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady's time has expired. for what purpose does the the gentlewoman from the virgin islands rise? mrs. christensen: to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mrs. christensen: thank you. it will be very hard to wish the american people happy new year unless this congress reaches and passes an agreement that keeps tankses from going up on the 98% who already have had to sacrifice during the recession, that extends unemployment, enables doctors to continue to care for their medicare beneficiaries, fixes the a.m.t., provides disaster recovery money to help our fellow americans, and passes a farm bill. democrats agreed last year to $1.5 trillion in cuts over the next 10 years, which are already in place. president obama offered several concessions. now republicans need to give up at least an equal amount on the revenue side. right now,
interviews to the economy former member of congress from connecticut and i am the president of the united states capitol and historical society. this interview with senator daniel inouye is part of a special series featuring asian-pacific members of congress. in these interviews current and fellow members have relived their memories of people, places and events that have shaped their public career. it is our hope that these recollections will provide listeners with a deeper appreciation prehuman dimension of representative government in this temple of liberty we know as the united states capitol. senator daniel inouye was born in honolulu hawaii on september 7th, 1924 and was named after a methodist minister who had adopted his mother. in march, 1943, he enlisted in the u.s. army's 44 regimental a team. he saw combat in italy and southern france and was badly wounded during an engagement for which he was awarded the distinguished service cross which was later upgraded to the medal of honor, the highest award for military valor. with financial assistance from the g.i. bill, inouye graduate
will call the roll. quorum call: the presiding officer: the senator from connecticut. mr. lieberman: i thank my friend who is the occupy pant of the chair. -- occupant of the chair. i ask unanimous consent that further proceedings of the under the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. lieberman: i yield back all time on this side. a senator: i yield back all time on this side. the presiding officer: all time has expired. the question is on the nomination. a senator: ask the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be a sufficient second. the clerk will call the roll. vote: vote: vote: vote: the presiding officer: are there any members wishing to vote or change their vote? if not, the ayes have 92, the nays 1. confirmation is confirmed. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the chairman. the majority leader. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent that not withstanding -- the presiding officer: order in the senate, please. order in the senate. mr. reid: i ask unanimous consent that not withstanding the pre
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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